Tag Archives: epilepsy

Omnitrans bus driver brings calm to chaos

Omnitrans coach operatorCoach Operator Jeremy Aragon was headed downtown on Route 14. When he brought the bus to a stop, he noticed a woman preparing to disembark. Without warning, she appeared to go into a seizure, falling and hitting her head on the rear step.

Passengers rushed forward to try to move her, but Jeremy intervened, warning them that they could potentially injure her. After checking to make sure she was still breathing, he contacted dispatch and requested immediate medical assistance. Jeremy stayed with the woman, telling her that she appeared to have had a seizure and that help was on the way.

“I knew the most important thing I could do at that moment was to monitor her condition so that I could keep the emergency medics updated,” Jeremy said. “I had trained as an EMT so I knew what information they needed. I also cleared the other passengers from the coach so they would have room to do their work without interference.”

The woman seized twice more before the emergency crew arrived, just minutes later. Thanks to Jeremy’s quick action and ongoing updates, the EMTs were well prepared for the situation. The woman explained that she was epileptic and had not taken her medicine for three weeks because she was waiting for a doctor’s prescription. Hooking her up to an IV, the team was able to stabilize her and safely move her from the coach to the ambulance.

Later Jeremy received recognition from Omnitrans for his calm handling of the crisis. But what no one realized was how close to home the situation had been for the young driver.

Omnitrans bus driver

“I kind of knew what to expect,” he admitted. “My mom was epileptic also. It was actually the weirdest thing. As a child, she was hit in the head with an anchor that was hoisted up by a cherry pick. And it caused her to have horrible, full blown grand mal seizures all her life. I’ve been taking care of her since I was three years old. So I’m a bit used to seizures and how to calm them.

“The best thing that you can do is turn them on their side and just rub them. Sometimes they can be disoriented, or even a little bit violent, coming out of it without realizing it. They’ve lost consciousness and don’t remember exactly what happened. Sometimes they have indications, like they’ll start getting hot flashes.

“My mom would stand up, because she could feel them coming on, which is the worst thing you can do. But that was just my mama. She’d say she was hot, and you could see it in her eyes. I’d go, ‘Mom, sit’ –but then she would just go into it. I would try to guide her, even at 3 or 4 years old, putting my arms up to break her fall. There were times when nobody was around, and she would go into a seizure. I would go downstairs to call the paramedics, and they would come out. Then I would do all the wrong things, like answer questions for my mama because I was protecting her.

Jeremy shrugs and smiles. “But you know, it raised me into a responsible young man. I wouldn’t change a thing. My mom is very special to me, and I would do it all over again for her. She tries to do so much for me, even now. When we go over to visit her on Sunday, she’ll have cooked like a 12 course dinner for us. My wife loves her too and goes over to help her out. My mom hasn’t had a seizure now in almost five years, and she’s been totally off the medication for three. The doctors say that she’s basically cured. It’s pretty amazing. God works miracles, I guess.”

Coach operator brings calm to chaos

Jeremy came to Omnitrans two years ago, on the recommendation of a friend at Riverside Transit Authority.

“I’m blessed in a lot of ways. Omnitrans has been everything I hoped for and then some. And my background has actually helped me quite a bit with my customer service and leadership skills. As an EMT, you learn how to bring order to chaos. Before, I had been doing caregiving for elderly patients with Alzheimer’s and dementia. Going from that to someone who knows what they’re saying and doing gives you a very different perspective on life and people–how we all connect with and treat each other. You learn how to go into any situation and bring calmness to it as soon as possible. The more calm the situation, the better the outcome for the person you’re dealing with, as well as everyone else. Sometimes it just takes gentle talk.”

Jeremy aspires to become an Omnitrans field supervisor, and feels that his ability to assess and diffuse a situation will be an asset. Although he is confident in his ability to handle a crisis, he admits there is one situation he hopes never to have to handle.

“My biggest fear is a baby,” he laughs. “I don’t ever want to have to deliver a baby on a bus. Even just thinking about the equipment I’d need makes me nervous. And there’s no stopping it. I’d almost have to take action. I had one passenger come up to me and say, ‘Hey I’m pregnant and on the way to the hospital.’ I told her, ‘Ma’am, please hold off on the contractions until we get to your destination.’”

Jeremy grins. “She had a pretty good laugh at that, but I was still relieved when she got to the hospital.”

 – Juno Kughler Carlson
juno.carlson@omnitrans.org