Tag Archives: omnitrans rider

Customers Love the SBTC Bicycle Hubitat!

by Ondrian Yeung, Marketing Intern

The grand opening of Bicycle Hubitat at the San Bernardino Transit Center was a great success! We had a number of community members from different parts of the city come down to learn how to fix their bikes. Everyone had fun spinning our prize wheel, and more importantly learned a lot about bike repair, and went home with a newly tuned up bike!

 “I appreciate it, I’ll be back!” said Levi King, a daily Omnitrans rider who uses the bus to get to school and back. Mark Friis of the Inland Empire Biking Alliance helped Levi fix the brakes on his bike. Levi shared that he’d known for a while that his bike had a problem, but he couldn’t afford to get it fixed. With the Hubitat’s requested $5 donation per session, Levi was able to get his bike fixed and pick up some knowledge for future repairs!

In fact, all of the customers  were eager to learn more about how to fix different parts of their bikes, whether it be the brakes, the tires, or even the chain.

“I wasn’t going to stop, but he [Mark] saw right away what was wrong with my bike as I rode by!” said Furnando Herrera, who uses Omnitrans to get between his home near San Manuel Casino and work, and whose alignment is now fixed and straightened.

“Fixing a bike is like surgery sometimes,” Mark explained as he fixed an intricate part of his client’s bike. “Every tiny piece has its own little spot. We supply the tools and help you figure out how to take care of things yourself.”

Special thanks to our partners at the Inland Empire Biking Alliance and San Bernardino Generation Now for making the Hubitat possible. Don’t forget to check out the Bicycle Hubitat every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 3:00-6:00pm at the San Bernardino Transit Center!

 

 

 

sbX Returns to Automatic Station Stops

As part of Omnitrans’ May 2 service changes, sbX Green Line buses will once again stop at every station along its route, on every trip.

In January, the rapid transit route began a test of only stopping on demand – i.e., when signaled by a passenger, or if customers were at a station waiting to board.

While the test was designed to help keep routes running on time during construction, it caused concern among customers and coach operators regarding visibility at stations. In response to these concerns, sbX vehicles will return to the original policy of stopping at every station along the route.

Please note that the sbX route continues to operate every 10 minutes during peak hours, and every 15 minutes throughout the day on weekdays.

Thanks to our customers for your patience and feedback!

Omnitrans rider loses wallet on bus 3 times–and gets it back!

Omnitrans passenger recovers lost wallet 3 times

Omnitrans Route 22 passenger Federico Gante has lost his wallet on the bus three times in the past four weeks. Each time it was found and turned in by someone on the bus.

“I don’t know how it keeps happening. I put it into my back pocket, and I guess it comes out of there,” he laughs. “I’m switching to another pocket now.”

Federico has been riding Omnitrans since he came here from Arizona back in February. He takes the bus every day to his job at  Papa Johns over on Pepper and San Bernardino.  

“I’m the Dough Master,” he grins. “Anytime you order a pizza, I’m the guy that makes it for you.”

If you happen to see Federico on Route 22, be sure to say hi and remind him to check his pocket before leaving the bus!

– Juno Kughler Carlson
juno.carlson@omnitrans.org 

Bus is Lifeline for 7-year old leukemia patient, family

Rider Amanda Perez is a 31-year-old mother of five who takes online classes through San Bernardino Valley College. She is working towards a degree in criminal justice and hopes to one day become a probation officer and help kids better their lives.

This busy mom relies on Omnitrans for all of her everyday errands from grabbing groceries to making doctor appointments. But most importantly, the bus has been a lifeline for her 7-year-old son Darnell.

In 2011, Darnell was diagnosed with leukemia and was hospitalized for a month at Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital. Amanda stayed by his side, sleeping each night in the chair beside his bed, while her other small children stayed home with their dad.

“It was very hard to be away from the kids for that month,” says Amanda. “But Darnell needed me there. He was constantly undergoing chemo, spinal taps and blood work. He lost all his hair. It’s a painful process for any to go through, but it’s especially hard for a child.”

When he was finally released, Darnell still had to return to oncology every couple of weeks for lab work and further treatments.

“Without Omnitrans, I don’t know how we would have done it,” says Amanda. “Our car was always having problems and was unreliable. When it eventually broke down, it was just too expensive to fix. With Darnell’s medical expenses, we just didn’t have the money to put into it. We depend on the bus for everything.”

Today, Darnell is stable. He still has to go in for a spinal tap every 6 weeks, but his mom is hopeful that they will be done with everything by May of next year.

“He is the bravest kid I know,” she admits. “He’s happy and loves school. You would never know from looking at him that anything was wrong. I used to get so worried sometimes, but he’d just smile and say ‘With God on my side everything will be fine.’”

Omnitrans rider helps hospice families

Cynthia Bushaw has ridden Omnitrans since she first moved to San Bernardino in November. The 59-years-young former kindergarten teacher is a cancer survivor and proud grandmother of 9. She stays active with volunteer work and enjoys assisting one of her daughters who runs a home school.

Having ridden public transit in metropolitan cities like Los Angeles and Miami, she gives Omnitrans high marks for its clean buses, frequent service and  helpful drivers.  Occasionally it’s a challenge finding priority seating at the front of the bus because Cynthia has a disability that is not obvious to the other passengers. “Because I don’t use a walker or wheelchair, they don’t realize I have a need. When that happens, the drivers are good about asking people to move. Overall my experience has been excellent.”

As a regular rider, Cynthia relies on the bus daily. “I use Omnitrans for family visits, doctor appointments, church, shopping, and the laundromat. I will also be volunteering for elderly respite and hospice work soon and will ride the bus to those appointments as well.”

She has worked in hospice assistance before and found the experience to be both rewarding and challenging. “I like knowing that I can help these families. Not everyone can deal with death. I’m able to give the caretakers a break away from the situation and provide whatever support is needed.”

Still, she admits,  it’s not an easy thing to do. “Anyone entering into a hospice program has 6 months or less to live. You do get attached to the people and their families.  The important thing is simply to be there for them. My own mom passed away two years ago at age 87.  Even when death is expected, it is never easy for those left behind. I like the feeling that I can help make a difference.”

– Juno Kughler Carlson
junocarlson@omnitrans.org

Do you like this story and want to use it for your blog or newsletter? All our stories may be freely re-posted and shared with others!

Do you have a great Omnitrans story to share? Let us know!
Email juno.carlson@omnitrans.org

Rider overcomes her fear of public transit

In 1988, Renee Compton became disabled due to a stroke and brain tumor that left her wheelchair bound. Unable to drive any longer, she grew increasingly isolated and depressed, seldom leaving her home.

Finally in 2002, she connected with Behavior Health in Rialto, and her world completely changed. “They encouraged me to use my office skills to help others by volunteering with the organization,” said Renee. “So I did. For the past ten years I’ve been teaching word processing and Microsoft computer programs to people. I love it. It makes me feel needed. And I enjoy helping people who want to learn.”

In order to get back and forth between her home and volunteer job, Renee had to take the bus, something she had been avoiding. “It was scary for me,” she admitted, “I was worried about having to deal with strange people. But I made myself get on board. And then I rode again the next day and the next. Now I ride the bus all the time. I even have my favorite drivers who are always very courteous and polite. Because my wheelchair doesn’t have straps, it takes a little longer to buckle in. But these particular drivers never become impatient with me and always take the time to help.”

Renee recently had the opportunity to ride on of the new Omnitrans Xcelsior buses on the Route 14.  She was excited by its spacious feel. “I thought the new bus was neat! It felt big and roomy, and the wider aisles make it easier for me to get the wheelchair on board. I’m looking forward to riding it again.”

Do you like this story and want to use it for your blog or newsletter? All our stories may be freely re-posted and shared with others!

Do you have a great Omnitrans story to share? Let us know!
Email juno.carlson@omnitrans.org

Pizza anyone?

Earlier this week, Marice Penida and her family climbed on board Omnitrans with five boxes of Little Caesars pizza they were bringing home for dinner. Both the bus driver and passengers grinned and teased “You bought us all pizza!”

“We do have a lot of fun with our drivers and the regulars,” laughs Marice. “My husband and I got to talking about it afterwards. We decided that, if we ever win the lotto, we want to buy a huge stack of pizzas and hand them out to everyone on the route.”

We love the thought, Marice–as long as people remember there’s no eating on the bus! What impresses us even more is when you say you’ll still ride the bus if you win the lotto.

“We really are a green family,” she says seriously. “That won’t ever change. And we love riding Omnitrans.”